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Macbat 64 Reviewed by Cyril Lachel on . Macbat 64 isn't an especially deep or involving platformer, but it does a good job of evoking the spirit of a bygone era. If 1998 is a time you would like to revisit, then you'll likely have a good time playing through this all-too-brief action game, but know that you're getting a short and limited game with a hero that isn't fleshed out in any way. I like the enthusiasm behind this game and wouldn't mind seeing this turned into a larger and more involving experience. Rating: 57%
Macbat 64
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Macbat 64 Macbat 64 Macbat 64 Macbat 64
  • Review Score:

  • C+
Thanks to the recent launch of the Switch, I've been thinking a lot about Nintendo's past consoles. Apparently the same can be said about German developer Siactro, who has created a game that is part parody and part loving homage to the early 3D games we saw on the Nintendo 64. Even the name, Macbat 64, evokes the spirit of all those over-priced cartridges we saved up for in the late 1990s. Thankfully, this brand new PC game isn't that expensive, but is that enough of a reason to put down the Joycons and return to the days when VHS tapes ruled the world and MTV still played music videos?

Not to be confused with Playtonic's Yooka-Laylee, Macbat 64 tells the story of a very British bat who is asked to go on an epic adventure from an old pirate parrot. Okay, maybe the adventure isn't all that epic, since the story is only made up of ten levels and takes about an hour to complete, but he's eager to take part all the same. This sends our flappy hero through a bunch of stages that parody everything from Banjo-Kazooie to Mario Kart 64.


Instead of playing through a bunch of huge areas, each level is small and self-contained. You'll end up spending a lot of the time searching for hidden items, coins and balloons in order to solve puzzles and help the colorful cast. Complete all the jobs and you'll earn a stamp, which will throw you into a whole new level with different backgrounds and objectives.

Macbat doesn't have a lot of moves, so most of the game revolves around him flying and looking for items. With the possible exception of the final boss and a couple brief arcade games, there isn't any combat to speak of. What we do get is a nice variety of locations that feel like a Nintendo 64 greatest hits collection. There's the island getaway, the haunted house, the 2D side-scrolling level and even a kart race. While none of these are as fleshed out as much as I would have liked, I do appreciate the effort.

Unfortunately, that's my complaint across the board. The game is insanely short, and it feels like it ends just as it's getting started. There are only ten stages in the main story, with three bonus stages unlocked after you beat the game. Even with the extras, it only took me an hour to do and see everything. In some ways, it's good that Macbat 64 ends before the gimmick wears thin, but it would have been nice to see a little more content added to the package.

Macbat 64 (Steam)Click For the Full Picture Archive

Visually, the game looks and feels like a lot of Nintendo 64 games. The camera is a little wonky and the characters are made out of only a few polygons. Mind you, I don't say that as a criticism, but rather a selling point. When you close your eyes and imagine a loving homage to a Nintendo 64 game, this is exactly what you might expect. The purposely outdated presentation is charming, and it has a solid retro soundtrack to boot.

Macbat 64 isn't an especially deep or involving platformer, but it does a good job of evoking the spirit of a bygone era. If 1998 is a time you would like to revisit, then you'll likely have a good time playing through this all-too-brief action game, but know that you're getting a short and limited game with a hero that isn't fleshed out in any way. I like the enthusiasm behind this game and wouldn't mind seeing this turned into a larger and more involving experience.
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