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Monumental Failure Reviewed by Cyril Lachel on . Monumental Failure may be free of facts, but it's certainly not lacking in fun. Although a bit short as a single-player game, the party comes to life the moment you add other people to the mix. This is a goofy premise that is executed well, ultimately leaving me wanting more. I do wish it had online play and there were a few more locations, but Monumental Failure is what some might call a historical success. Rating: 71%
Monumental Failure
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  • Review Score:

  • B
Have you ever wondered how the Roman Colosseum was built? What about Stonehenge and the great pyramids? Well forget about watching some boring documentary narrated by a stuffy know-it-all, because Monumental Failure is here to put the fun back in studying historical architecture. And while you probably won't learn anything from playing Scary Wizard Games' newest release, you will have a great time banging up some of the world's greatest landmarks.

Of course, Monumental Failure doesn't even attempt to be historically accurate. This is a game where lowly construction workers push giant blocks into place using those stupid Swagway Hoverboards. It's the kind of game where jetpacks are routinely employed and playing Plinko with a giant Moai head is no big deal. It plays fast and loose with the source material, turning it into a goofy good time that works as both a single player game and multiplayer experience.


You play a team of four construction workers who is tasked with pushing various objects into place. In theory, you're trying to build six iconic landmarks one piece at a time, but that's easier said than done. What makes this job so tricky is that you're forced to control two groups of workers at the exact same time using both of the analog sticks. And if that wasn't stressful enough, you are only given a few seconds to move the object into place and finish the level. Your reward for completing the task is a score from the judges and a chance to tackle an even harder stage.

Although it starts simple enough, Monumental Failure doesn't take long to ratchet up the difficulty. You'll go from simple pushing challenges to positioning the pieces from the air, on a giant vehicle and even through lava. You'll have to navigate past rickety old bridges, avoid the walking dead and use the inconvenient moving platforms to your advantage. None of these obstacles make any sense, but I didn't mind. I was just excited to see what madness they would throw at me next.

You might think that adding a second person would make the game easier, but that is definitely not the case. With the clock ticking down and the challenge piling up, you'll need perfect communication skills to get out of this stressful situation alive. But that's also half of the fun of Monumental Failure. The levels are never long enough to cause real frustration and, when it all clicks, it's an immensely satisfying experience.

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This is not a game built around pinpoint accurate controls and perfect mechanics; it's a game where you laugh at your terrible construction work. Monumental Failure is meant to be played with other people having a great time, so it's nice to see that up to four can join in on both the co-op and competitive fun. Unfortunately, the one downside is that there isn't any online multiplayer, so you'll need to pile everybody around the computer if you want to have the best time.

As a single-player game, Monumental Failure doesn't have a whole lot of hooks to keep you interested. While it's nice being able to control both teams at the same time, I found the whole exercise a little too easy. You'll quickly unlock all six stages, which leaves very little incentive to keep playing. The fun of this game comes from getting people together and going at each other, not trying to perfect your scores and unlock new headgear in the single-player mode.

Monumental Failure may be free of facts, but it's certainly not lacking in fun. Although a bit short as a single-player game, the party comes to life the moment you add other people to the mix. This is a goofy premise that is executed well, ultimately leaving me wanting more. I do wish it had online play and there were a few more locations, but Monumental Failure is what some might call a historical success.
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